Saturday, June 28, 2014

Ewa Plains HART Guideway and Stations Intersects with 1825 Malden Trail Survey

Ewa Plains HART Guideway and Stations Intersects with 1825 Malden Trail Survey

***********************************************************

Honolulu City Council RESOLUTION 12-172, CD1 (2012) passed unanimously:

URGING THE HAWAII COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY AND THE STATE OF HAWAII TO RECOGNIZE AND PRESERVE THE HISTORIC TRAILS OF THE EWA PLAINS

WHEREAS, the trails in the Ewa Plains area later known as Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Ewa and Naval Air Station (NAS) Barbers Point, and today called Kalaeloa as administered by the Hawaii Community Development Authority, are part of the greater Ewa Plains of West Oahu; and

WHEREAS, the Ewa Plains is a massive ancient karst coral reef where ocean meets mountain streams and fresh rain water percolates through porous 100,000 year old coral to spawn freshwater shrimp and one of Hawaii’s most diverse limu varieties; and

WHEREAS, these Ewa Plains trails and their adjacent historic sites provide clues as to how communities were linked socially, economically, and politically; which areas were important in early times, places of commerce, and religion; and where valuable forest or sea resources were once located; and

WHEREAS, these Ewa Plains trails were first identified after Western contact by Lieutenant C.R. Maiden of the Royal Navy in 1825 and became known as the Maiden Trails on the first published Oahu maps; and

WHEREAS, these Ewa Plains trails identified by Maiden became used for ranching and horseback transportation and became an indelible part of West Oahu’s 150 year old Paniolo and Pa’u horseback culture and early Hawaiian Kingdom history of ranches and farms which were the original Western economic settlements of the Ewa Plains; and

WHEREAS, these identified trails became the location where the Ewa Mill and Plantation was established and why the Oahu Railway was extended to this very important trailside agricultural community which allowed sugar cane to become the major economic engine of the Ewa Plains; and

WHEREAS, these Ewa Plains trails in 1925, due to the nearby location of Ewa Mill and the Oahu Railway, became incorporated into the United States (U.S.) Navy development of Ewa Mooring Mast Field as a naval airship mooring site; and

WHEREAS, these trails, springs, and underground karst water transport system later became further documented in State and Federal land surveys and aquifer maps, and in 1941 when the Ewa Mooring Mast Field became a U.S. Marine Corps airbase known as Ewa Field, these walking and horse ranch trails continued to be used by the Marines and Ewa Plantation community for access to the shoreline; and

WHEREAS, after the Japanese air attack on December 7, 1941 and the great expansion of the area into military airports which became MCAS Ewa and NAS Barbers Point during World War II, these trails were important for military training, patrols on foot and mounted Marine Corps horseback security patrols; and

WHEREAS, after the closure of the Marine and Navy airbases, published I 950s maps show the trails on former MCAS Ewa that are still used today by the Barbers Point riding club; and

WHEREAS, these historic horse and foot trails also link with the over 100 year old Oahu Railway right-of-way and Pearl Harbor Historic Trail plan that allows travel by foot, horse or bike from Pearl Harbor to Nanakuli, and which places the Ewa Plains trails as a center junction point and provides access to the Ewa shoreline; and

WHEREAS, an educational feature of these Ewa Plains trails could also be restored karst sinkhole sites along the trailways explaining the ecological system that sustains the iimu, nourishes food sources such as freshwater shrimp and which helps perpetuate Ewa’s offshore fisheries and sustainability; and

WHEREAS, these trails’ could become a cultural, historic, recreational and educational experience of walking, biking or horseback riding over trails featuring native Hawaiian plants, bird and aquatic life, telling cultural histories, explaining geological facts; and

WHEREAS, an Ewa Plains historic trails project could be a community supported endeavor bringing together cultural practitioners, educators, scientists, environmental and veteran organizations in a positive, holistic concept for community education, recreation and restoration; and

WHEREAS, recreational trails in Ewa could qualify for federal National Park Service (NPS) Recreational Trails Program funding,as well as Surface Transportation Program Flexible, Transportation Enhancement, and Congestion Mitigation Air Quality Improvement Program funding and would be consistent with the Oahu Regional Transportation Plan; and

WHEREAS, federal programs such as the NPS Service Battlefield Protection Program have already awarded a $53,000 grant to help define the Ewa Field battlefield as an historic site, and which could include walking trails and points for historic interpretation; and

WHEREAS, federal programs such as the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service have programs to restore Ewa Plains karst sinkholes and have already demonstrated that native freshwater shrimp can be restocked and flourish in these unique karst sinkhole habitats, providing working environments for education and training; and

WHEREAS, there are many interested individuals from equestrian clubs, biking, recreational groups, schools, colleges and universities, active duty military family and morale, welfare and recreation organizations, that could benefit from and assist in supporting an Ewa Plains trails program; now, therefore,

BE IT RESOLVED by the Council of the City and County of Honolulu that it supports the mapping and identification of historic trails in the Ewa Plains; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Hawaii Community Development Authority, the State of Hawaii, the United States government, and the City and County of Honolulu are urged to participate in the mapping and identification of the Ewa Plains historic trails; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City and County of Honolulu will not expend any monies to provide for the mapping and

BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED that copies of this Resolution be transmitted to the Hawaii Community Development Authority, the Governor, the Department of Hawaiian Homelands, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, the President of the United States, the Commander of United States Pacific Command, and the Mayor.

DATE OF INTRODUCTION: 2012 (Passed unanimously 2012)

INTRODUCED BY:

Councilman Tom Berg



Ewa Plain Trails Map by Lt. Malden, Royal Navy

South Oahu Trails Map


Ewa Plain Karst (Ancient Coral Reef)

New AIS Testimony: Rail Route Damages Hawaiian Cultural Properties

by Kanehili Cultural Hui

Numerous groups and organizations submitted comments and testimony on the 22 mile Honolulu Rail Archaeological Impact Statement (AIS) to the State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) to meet the May 30th Deadline. The new AIS comment period had been extended because of last year's Hawaii Supreme Court ruling that the rail AIS cannot be done in phases or segments.

The previous 2009 AIS omitted a great deal of valid cultural information, many groups were not consulted, and data was skewed to fit a 'rush-to-begin-building-the-rail' agenda, rather than any attempt at honest historic and cultural preservation. The law finally caught up with them.
In his ruling, Federal Judge Wallace Tashima made a special point of noting his concern about the identification of Traditional Cultural Properties (TCPs) along the HART rail route. It was later made clear in recent HART meetings that TCP's include all cultures, not just native Hawaiian, as per federal law.

HART is required to also adhere to Department of Transportation Act of 1966 special provision - Section 4(f) - which stipulates that US DOT agencies-including the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), cannot approve the use of land from wildlife and waterfowl refuges or public or private historical sites unless both of the following conditions apply:
  1. There is no feasible and prudent alternative.
  2. The action includes all possible planning to minimize harm to the property resulting from use.
Hawaiian Cultural Practitioner Mike Lee, along with Hawaii Thousand Friends, submitted approximately 800 pages of detailed comment and testimony on the the HART Rail AIS covering the entire 22 mile route. This package included maps, photographs, emails with many agencies (HART, SHPD, DLNR, BLNR, Oahu Burial Council, HCDA, etc.) that go back nearly a decade, as well as news articles, historic research and citations, legal documents and filings, native Hawaiian rights, the Clean Water Act, and much more.

A key issue for Lee is the identification of the ancient coral reef limestone along the Oahu shoreline known as Karst, which connects volcanic mountain lava tube water to the shoreline Karst reef water systems. These water springs feed a shoreline ecosystem and was how ancient Hawaiians managed their fish ponds. The Karst was also of very high spiritual importance to ancient Hawaiians and used for sacred burials, such as downtown Honolulu on the grounds of I'olani Palace where there is an ancient Karst burial cave.

"I wanted them to know that I wasn't just making this up ten minutes ago" said Lee. "I am a Konohikist- I believe in the ecological management and protection of our very important natural island water systems. Protecting our Wahi Kapu sites is also very important to me."

Lee's testimony concerns identification and protection of important Hawaiian cultural sites along the rail route, including wahi pana (sacred sites) and wahi kapu (sacred burial areas) and their inclusion into a TCP (Traditional Cultural Properties) that would make sure these special sites, caves, caverns, springs, ponds and water systems are preserved and not contaminated during rail construction.

Also included were photographs of Kawaiaha'o Church which is a graphic example of early Karst limestone block construction. The church and surrounding walls are made of rough ancient reef from the shoreline and ancient sea shells and marine organisms can be clearly seen. The church is also located on the site of an important ancient Karst spring. Nearby I'olani Palace and the royal guard barracks are also constructed from Karst limestone blocks from the shoreline.

In addition, Kanehili Cultural Hui also submitted another approximately 250 pages of detailed comment and testimony on the the HART Rail AIS- primarily concerned with the Honouliuli-Ewa area and the documentation of previously unidentified Traditional Cultural Properties (TCP), Ewa Historic Districts, Ewa Dec 7, 1941 Battlefield Area and an outline for a Honouliuli-Ewa Cultural Landscape Report.

Many current or former Ewa Village residents helped by supplying historic documents, maps, photos and oral histories. The Kanehili Hui name comes from the original Hawaiian name for the Honouliuli-Ewa area and is mentioned by Hawaiian goddess Hi'iaka in her famous and often quoted chants when she traveled through the Ewa Plains area aprroximately 1000 years ago.
The Kanehili Cultural Hui 501-c-3 non-profit community organization is concerned with the entire cultural history of the area- from ancient times to modern times.

A key focus of the Kanehili Cultural Hui report and testimony was on the 1825 Malden Trails (ancient Hawaiian Trails- believed to have possibly been originally constructed by very early Tahitian arrivals to Kanehili) which played a major role in the Hawaiian cultural history of the Honouliuli-Ewa area, and which was entirely left out of the HART Rail AIS.
The fixed guideway and stations directly overlay the 1825 trails as well as the Kalo'i Karst waterway that flows to the Ewa shoreline.

Also of major importance is the identification and location of the Leina a ka Uhane, a sacred spiritual leaping off place for souls returning to the ancient homeland of Tahiti. This is a National Register eligible TCP, yet HART and the SHPD administrator has continuously tried to minimize the importance and geographic area of this TCP as well as apparently intentionally misidentify its location, despite the error being brought to their attention several times since last year.

The previous Rail AIS also failed in many ways to adequately document important Honouliuli-Ewa cultural sites such as the greater Ewa Plantation and railway network that was the largest private railway in Hawaii. The Oahu Railway that served Honouliuli-Ewa plantation railway was chartered under King David Kalakaua.

A Cultural Landscape Report (CLR) is the primary report that documents the history, significance and treatment of a cultural landscape. A CLR evaluates the history and integrity of the landscape including any changes to its geographical context, features, materials,and use.








Electric Train Disaster: Kapolei-We​st Oahu: 138,000 Volts Every Morning and Afternoon.​..

Electric Train Disaster: Kapolei-We​st Oahu: 138,000 Volts Every Morning and Afternoon.​..


The Ewa Electric Rail Disaster Movie - Trailer: under 4 minutes

See how an electric rail transit scheme turned the 150 year
old Ewa plantation community in Hawaii into a mega development
with fake new Hawaiian names while also covering over the
very best farmland on Oahu with asphalt, concrete and
elevated rail line and stations directly UNDER high voltage power lines.







Kapolei-West Oahu Rail Stations:

Walking, standing, riding - right UNDER -

138,000 Volts Every Morning and Afternoon...

(Did they actually plan it this way?)



At night HART commuters can carry long florescent tubes and
have mock light saber battles on the station platforms!

(High voltage power lines put out intense electro-magnetic fields
as has been demonstrated in videos...)

John Pritchett cartoon annotated with 138 kV


Ewa Plains 1825 Malden Trails - Important Hawaiian Cultural History Still Being Denied

Ewa Plains 1825 Malden Trails - Important Hawaiian Cultural History Being Denied By Developers

by John Bond

Some of the most important native Hawaiian Trails in the State of Hawaii exist on the Ewa Plains, and are supposed to be protected by a special State Law, but these trails are being regularly bulldozed over and the important archeological sites around them being destroyed.



First mapped and published in 1825 was the work by Royal Navy Lt. Malden

The ahupua'a of Honouliuli




 The trails identified in published 1825 Royal Navy survey map
The approximate location of the trails today


The trails ran from the important ancient Honouliuli community by West Loch to One'ula Beach, Kualaka'i Beach and by Puu o Kapolei to Kahe Point - Waianae


Parts of the trail network is still there today but unrecognized by developers and the City and State


A trail head at Ewa Village was the reason the Ewa Plantation was located there in 1890's

Approximate areas where the trails run today down Coral Sea Rd and to One'ula Beach

1990's Tuggles Map done for Navy BRAC of NAS Barbers Point

Close up of Tuggles Map showing trail route



The Pearl Harbor historic trail actually follows the old Oahu Railway line and is NOT the route of the 1825 Malden Trails which led to ancient Kanehili


***********************************************************


Honolulu City Council RESOLUTION 12-172, CD1 (2012) passed unanimously:


URGING THE HAWAII COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY AND THE STATE OF HAWAII TO RECOGNIZE AND PRESERVE THE HISTORIC TRAILS OF THE EWA PLAINS.

WHEREAS, the trails in the Ewa Plains area later known as Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Ewa and Naval Air Station (NAS) Barbers Point, and today called Kalaeloa as administered by the Hawaii Community Development Authority, are part of the greater Ewa Plains of West Oahu; and

WHEREAS, the Ewa Plains is a massive ancient karst coral reef where ocean meets mountain streams and fresh rain water percolates through porous 100,000 year old coral to spawn freshwater shrimp and one of Hawaii’s most diverse limu varieties; and

WHEREAS, these Ewa Plains trails and their adjacent historic sites provide clues as to how communities were linked socially, economically, and politically; which areas were important in early times, places of commerce, and religion; and where valuable forest or sea resources were once located; and

WHEREAS, these Ewa Plains trails were first identified after Western contact by Lieutenant C.R. Maiden of the Royal Navy in 1825 and became known as the Maiden Trails on the first published Oahu maps; and

WHEREAS, these Ewa Plains trails identified by Maiden became used for ranching and horseback transportation and became an indelible part of West Oahu’s 150 year old Paniolo and Pa’u horseback culture and early Hawaiian Kingdom history of ranches and farms which were the original Western economic settlements of the Ewa Plains; and

WHEREAS, these identified trails became the location where the Ewa Mill and Plantation was established and why the Oahu Railway was extended to this very important trailside agricultural community which allowed sugar cane to become the major economic engine of the Ewa Plains; and

WHEREAS, these Ewa Plains trails in 1925, due to the nearby location of Ewa Mill and the Oahu Railway, became incorporated into the United States (U.S.) Navy development of Ewa Mooring Mast Field as a naval airship mooring site; and

WHEREAS, these trails, springs, and underground karst water transport system later became further documented in State and Federal land surveys and aquifer maps, and in 1941 when the Ewa Mooring Mast Field became a U.S. Marine Corps airbase known as Ewa Field, these walking and horse ranch trails continued to be used by the Marines and Ewa Plantation community for access to the shoreline; and

WHEREAS, after the Japanese air attack on December 7, 1941 and the great expansion of the area into military airports which became MCAS Ewa and NAS Barbers Point during World War II, these trails were important for military training, patrols on foot and mounted Marine Corps horseback security patrols; and

WHEREAS, after the closure of the Marine and Navy airbases, published I 950s maps show the trails on former MCAS Ewa that are still used today by the Barbers Point riding club; and

WHEREAS, these historic horse and foot trails also link with the over 100 year old Oahu Railway right-of-way and Pearl Harbor Historic Trail plan that allows travel by foot, horse or bike from Pearl Harbor to Nanakuli, and which places the Ewa Plains trails as a center junction point and provides access to the Ewa shoreline; and

WHEREAS, an educational feature of these Ewa Plains trails could also be restored karst sinkhole sites along the trailways explaining the ecological system that sustains the iimu, nourishes food sources such as freshwater shrimp and which helps perpetuate Ewa’s offshore fisheries and sustainability; and

WHEREAS, these trails’ could become a cultural, historic, recreational and educational experience of walking, biking or horseback riding over trails featuring native Hawaiian plants, bird and aquatic life, telling cultural histories, explaining geological facts; and

WHEREAS, an Ewa Plains historic trails project could be a community supported endeavor bringing together cultural practitioners, educators, scientists, environmental and veteran organizations in a positive, holistic concept for community education, recreation and restoration; and

WHEREAS, recreational trails in Ewa could qualify for federal National Park Service (NPS) Recreational Trails Program funding,as well as Surface Transportation Program Flexible, Transportation Enhancement, and Congestion Mitigation Air Quality Improvement Program funding and would be consistent with the Oahu Regional Transportation Plan; and

WHEREAS, federal programs such as the NPS Service Battlefield Protection Program have already awarded a $53,000 grant to help define the Ewa Field battlefield as an historic site, and which could include walking trails and points for historic interpretation; and

WHEREAS, federal programs such as the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service have programs to restore Ewa Plains karst sinkholes and have already demonstrated that native freshwater shrimp can be restocked and flourish in these unique karst sinkhole habitats, providing working environments for education and training; and

WHEREAS, there are many interested individuals from equestrian clubs, biking, recreational groups, schools, colleges and universities, active duty military family and morale, welfare and recreation organizations, that could benefit from and assist in supporting an Ewa Plains trails program; now, therefore,

BE IT RESOLVED by the Council of the City and County of Honolulu that it supports the mapping and identification of historic trails in the Ewa Plains; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Hawaii Community Development Authority, the State of Hawaii, the United States government, and the City and County of Honolulu are urged to participate in the mapping and identification of the Ewa Plains historic trails; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City and County of Honolulu will not expend any monies to provide for the mapping and

BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED that copies of this Resolution be transmitted to the Hawaii Community Development Authority, the Governor, the Department of Hawaiian Homelands, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, the President of the United States, the Commander of United States Pacific Command, and the Mayor.

DATE OF INTRODUCTION: 2012 (Passed unanimously 2012)

INTRODUCED BY:

Councilman Tom Berg

*************************************************************
Charles Robert Malden (9 August 1797 – 23 May 1855), was a nineteenth-century British naval officer, surveyor and educator. He is the discoverer of Malden Island in the central Pacific, which is named in his honour.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Robert_Malden

He passed the examination in the elements of mathematics and the theory of navigation at the Royal Naval Academy on 2–4 September 1816, and became a 1st Lieutenant on 1 September 1818. In eight years of active service as an officer, he served two and a half years in a surveying ship in the Mediterranean (1818–21), one and a half years in a surveying sloop in the English Channel and off the coast of Ireland (1823–24), and one and a half years as Surveyor of the frigate HMS Blonde during a voyage (1824–26) to and from the Hawaiian Islands (then known as the "Sandwich islands").[1] In Hawaii he surveyed harbours which, he noted, were "said not to exist by Captains Cook and Vancouver." On the return voyage he discovered and explored uninhabited Malden Island in the central Pacific on 30 July 1825. After his return he left active service but remained at half pay. He served for several years as hydrographer to King William IV.






Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Kalaeloa Fires In Former Barbers Point Naval Air Station Trigger Arson Concerns

Kalaeloa Fires In Former Barbers Point Naval Air Station Trigger Arson Concerns

By Jim Mendoza  KALAELOA, OAHU   Hawaii News Now
 
 
   Ash on the ground and scorched tree limbs litter an acre in Kalaeloa where a brushfire recently burned.

"The disturbing thing is that the fire was quite intense and went up into the trees and burned a lot of these large trees. We're hoping they'll survive," Ewa Beach resident John Bond said.



He said over the past two months brushfires have popped up in several spots in Kalaeloa on property leased by developer Hunt Hawaii.

Hunt chief operating officer Alan Ong said he's aware of three fires.

"The more recent ones seem to be more located in the eastern portion of our land holdings. They range from an acre to something significantly smaller," he said. "There are no structures that have been damaged. It's mostly vacant land."

Bond believes the fires were set on purpose because of the proximity to busy streets.
"We suspect they're just driving by in a car and they've got a cigarette butt or something else they can flick out into the dry grass," he said.



One recent blaze burned near the corner of Hornet Street and Saratoga Avenue, about a block from Barbers Point Elementary School. The entire area was once part of Barbers Point Naval Air Station.
Bond said Navy security patrolled it until October of last year.

"Shortly after that the people got the message that it was okay to do whatever they wanted out here," he said.

Ong said a lot has improved since the company took over the property, but illegal dumping and vandalism are ongoing issues. He's asking the public for help.



"If anybody should drive by and see any kind of suspicious activity or suspect something might be going on, I encourage them to call the police. Dial 911 and report it," he said.

Hunt plans to increase its security patrols, and will meet with federal, state and city officials on Thursday to discuss the recent brushfires.

See new updates or related to this story here:

http://barbers-point.blogspot.com/2013/10/Kalaeloa-Arson-For-Profit.html

http://barbers-point.blogspot.com/2013/09/Big-Ewa-Trees-Dying.html

http://barbers-point.blogspot.com/2013/09/Navy-Homes-Being-Destroyed.html

 

Sunday, August 25, 2013

Navy NavFac Hawaii Allows Extensive Damage, Illegal Dumping at Sacred Site


Navy NavFac  Hawaii Allows Extensive Damage, Illegal Dumping at Sacred Leina a ka Uhane - Wahi Pana identified in 2012 Federal EIS.

 

Nearly all of the dumping is being done on property NOT LEASED by
Hunt Corp from Navy- but Navy does nothing and doesn't care what
Hunt Corp does on this Federal property.

It is apparent that NavFac Navy Pacific allows Hunt Corp to evade
State and Federal NEPA and NHPA laws and NavFac staff are apparently
involved in supporting this wahi pana site desecration.

Hunt Corporation is aggressively moving ahead with site construction
throughout identified historic MCAS Ewa Field without benefit of a Federal
Section 106, as was originally promised and ASSURED (on video) by
Navy officials to the Ewa community in 2011 after an initial Battlefield
Survey and historic building inventory was conducted.

Further the area was identified as a very sacred wahi pana in an April
2012 Honolulu Area Rapid Transit - Federal Transit Administration
Environmental Impact Assessment cultural-archeological survey
report as the Leina a ka Uhane- a sacred corridor and portal for native
Hawaiian souls making the journey into the afterlife.

So many community promises continue to be broken and the deception never
stops on this historic site, as was the case with a previous 106 project
the entire community refused to sign.


The latest Hunt Corp project right now is digging a large pit into the ancient coral limestone Karst layer only feet away from a previously identified ancient Hawaiian Karst wall structure that exists throughout a large area directly next to
this current construction pit. Karst is well documented as native burial areas and previous successful lawsuits have been won about lack of respect for native Hawaiian cultural burial sites.

There was no monitoring archeologist on site while aggressive digging was
underway this past week. The Navy NavFac staff has repeatedly misinformed or not informed the local community about projects like this. It was promised that anything beyond general land surface clearing would bring about a Section 106 under Federal NHPA laws. This has never happened and large steel beam structures and other building additions are being put up in this location.

The area was identified in 1999 Navy BRAC surveys as the most likely site for the 1825 Malden Trail- actually a very ancient Hawaiian trail system linking Honouliuli West-Loch with the Ewa shoreline at Kualaka'i and One'ula Beach.
The Navy in Hawaii has allowed Hunt Corp to turn this into a construction and
dump site, including using land that isn't even on their leased areas.

This entire local area is known to have numerous Hawaiian archeological
sites, burial sites, Karst caves, rare native plants, birds and many sinkholes (which Hunt Corp is filling in whenever found) and most importantly, has been identified in the FTA HART Federal Rail EIS as the "Leina a ka Uhane" a very sacred spirit portal back to the ancient homeland of Tahiti. This means it is a very special, sacred area to native Hawaiians. This could likely be grounds for
a lawsuit.

It is not a coincidence that the sacred "Leina" spirit leap area and ancient trails
are in the same place and this entire area is archeologically and culturally very significant on many levels. Yet the Navy has consistently refused to do any
Archeological Inventory Surveys and Cultural Landscape survey- claiming
that everything "they want to know" was done decades ago. In reality it is totally an illegal act and counter to Federal laws and best practice land management of government properties.

This is all counter to all recent high level State court cases. The NavFac Hunt Corp Navy acts in a very lawless manner and greatly damages public goodwill and opinion about the Navy in Hawaii. They have intentionally ignored the important historic and cultural features of this area and have continued to dig up, plow over and evade public land responsibilities on this property that the Navy said was part of the original lease agreement.
 
This area was also identified in a public State House and Senate Resolution, NCR-49, in 2009 as recommended for historic and cultural preservation, and supported also by three local Neighborhood Board resolutions. Every possible notice of public concern has been made and filed about this area for years but the Hunt Corp Navy continues to completely disregard and effectively deceive repeated stated public opinion. Totally lawless is how this Navy operation is run.
 
 
 

 
Illegal dumping without permits on property not even leased from Navy



 
Illegal dumping without permits on property not even leased from Navy



 
Hawaiian Rock Wall runs through a large part of this property

 

The entire Ewa Plain is a vast Karst (ancient Coral Reef) shelf
 

 


 
Construction work into Karst without any archeological survey (typical on Navy land)
 
 
 
1825 Malden Trails shown running through historic MCAS Ewa Warehouse District
 
 
1825 Malden Trails shown running near Coral Sea Road, former NAS Barbers Point - Kalaeloa
 

 
1825 Malden Trails shown running through former NAS Barbers Point - Kalaeloa

 
 

 
The Ahupua'a of Honouliuli


 
1825 Mapped Malden Trails running through ancient Kanehili
 
 


 
Malden Trail shown running from Honouliuli - West Loch across historic Ewa Plantation

 
Malden Trail shown running across historic Ewa Plantation
 
 
Pearl Harbor Historic Trail follows the Oahu Railway line
 

HCR 49, HD1     2009

 
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION EWA, OAHU, AS A NATIONAL MONUMENT AND PLACEMENT OF EWA FIELD ON THE REGISTERS OF HISTORIC PLACES.
 
Urges the President of the United States, the Secretary of Defense, Secretary of the Interior, and United States Navy to preserve Marine Corps Air Station Ewa, or a portion of it, as a
National Monument.
Requests the United States Navy and its private, public and non-profit partners to proceed with the research, battlefield analysis, and other activities necessary to designate an appropriate boundary for nomination of Ewa Field to the Hawaii State and National
Registers of Historic Places.



Sunday, August 11, 2013

Honolulu Votes To Desecrate, Destroy Important Hawaiian Cultural Site

City Council, Mayor of Honolulu Votes To Desecrate And Destroy Important Hawaiian Cultural Site With Bill 65

 
Federal EIS Document Shows Location and Importance Of Major Hawaiian Burial Site
 
All historic and cultural research shows that this Honouliuli-Ewa area is one of the most very important cultural and historic area's in the State of Hawaii. The identified "Leina a ka Uhane"
is an especially sacred wahi pana of the highest level. A HART EIS TCP (Traditional Cultural Place) report in April 2012 documents this.
 
 
 
One could almost say with certainty that there appears to be a sacred "cosmic alignment" of Hawaiian cultural history and western history in this special TCP area. The major aviation fields, beginning with the 1925 Mooring Mast Field, all have in common with the ancient Hawaiian Leina belief, a "spirit leaping" or "flying away" concept. All pilots know the spiritual aspects of flying a plane.
 
This ancient area, before it became MCAS Ewa and Barbers Point naval airports, was known as Kanehili, which was very much associated in Hawaiian cultural history with birds-"manu" and for special ceremonial bird feathers. In modern times scientists have found in the many Karst sinkholes and caves of this area the bones of ancient rare birds, including large pre-historic birds too large to fly.
 
The major 1825 mapped trails show Oahu's largest native population- Honouliuli Ewa- centered around rich, fertile lo'i farmlands, clear fresh streams, Karst springs, and linked to mountain forest resources, abundant and prolific shoreline ponds, fisheries and the best limu in on Oahu. Limu is not only very important as a food and medicine, but also a critically important part of the shoreline ecology that is today being destroyed.
 
This same area is where the ancient Tahitians arrived and planted the first breadfruit tree. Elaborate trails were built to link the many important Kanehili areas with Honouliuli, and were used for the annual Makahiki ceremonies. Hawaiian goddess Hi'iaka describes a journey through this area nearly one thousand years ago. On certain special nights the legions of ancient Hawaiian warriors, killed in the area's epic land battles, are known to march with torches on these same Honouliuli Ewa spiritual trails.
 
A large area of the most important, rich and fertile ancient Hawaiian farmland on Oahu, going back 1000 years and supporting Oahu's largest Hawaiian population, where the bones of hundreds of thousands of native Hawaiian farmers and island warriors are buried, will soon be covered over by a Texas corporation forever because of City Bill 65.
 
 
 
The very special Leina a ka Uhane will soon be totally destroyed by another Texas corporation in concert with City Bill 65 and the State's development authority- HCDA. Many areas have already been badly polluted and desecrated under HCDA's administration and nothing is being done to stop it, despite State laws and State Constitutional statutes. This what we have today as a "government" supposedly "for the people..."
 
What is it about Texas Corporations that are so intent on buying off our Hawaii politicians, using HCDA and Bill 65, so that they can destroy the most important and sacred lands on Oahu? Doesn't this seem like the ultimate greed and stupidity and so completely counter to "The Life Of The Land Is Perpetuated In Righteousness" ?
 
For those of us who have walked the land and have seen and felt the very special MANA (power) of this very special area know what a huge travesty and desecration is taking place- all in the name of greed and political payoffs. Without a doubt, some day a great disaster will befall  these evil desecrators of Oahu's most important lands and resources because this is simply not pono.
 
Those responsible for the rape of our lands should be looking over their shoulders and up to the heavens; there is not one ounce of moral justification for what Bill 65 developers and Hawaii politicians are doing to destroy the historic and cultural sites of these Honouliuli Ewa sacred places.

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Honolulu Star-Advertiser: Rare native plant stalls land plans for Kalaeloa

Native Hawaiian Akoko Hinders HCDA Development Plans In Kalaeloa, West Oahu



Apr 21, 2013
 
 


An endangered native shrub found naturally on a plot of Navy land at the old Barbers Point Naval Air Station and nowhere else on the planet is at the center of a stalled land swap involving the Navy, state and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The population of Chamaesyce skottsbergii var. kalaeloana, otherwise known as the Ewa Plains akoko, dwindled from about 5,000 plants in 1979 to just over 630 last year, according to the service.

"If something isn't done to conserve this plant, then it's going to go extinct," said Aaron Nadig, a Fish and Wildlife biologist.
 
What should be done — and by whom — appears to be the million-dollar question in a time of ever-tightening budgets.
 
The Hawaii Community Development Authority, which is responsible for redeveloping the shuttered Navy base, said about 250 acres on three parcels, including the one that's home to the akoko, were offered to it after the Fish and Wildlife Service and state Department of Land and Natural Resources turned the land down.
 
The akoko occupies 150 to 160 acres at what used to be the Navy's northern trap and skeet range.
 
In 2011, the HCDA, a state agency, proposed an ambitious solar energy farm for that parcel, as well as on 80 acres of the adjoining southern trap and skeet range. No akoko has been identified on the southern parcel, officials said.
 
That later became a plan for 5 to 10 megawatts of photovoltaics on the northern site and 5 megawatts on the southern parcel, said Anthony Ching, HCDA's executive director.
 
Ching said prospective solar companies could work around the akoko. But in addition to a Fish and Wildlife Service recommendation that 99 acres of the northern site be set aside for an akoko preserve, the service said HCDA would have to be responsible for the ongoing preservation of the plant, Ching said.
 
Developing a conservation management plan, putting in fencing and a firebreak road, doing clearing work, and hiring people to maintain the site and the akoko could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars in short- and long-term costs, Ching said.
 
"Let's call it a million-dollar commitment," he said.
 
Ching said Fish and Wildlife is "trying to establish an unfunded mandate (for HCDA) for a situation for which they themselves chose not to take responsibility."
 
He noted that an earlier proposal had HCDA setting aside 50 acres for akoko on the northern site. The Fish and Wildlife recommendation now is for 99 acres.
 
Both the northern and southern trap and skeet ranges were designated as "critical habitat" for the akoko, officials said.
 
"It (the akoko preservation) is a worthy effort. It's the law. We should protect our endangered species. I have no problem with that," Ching said. "But it can't be unreasonable. You can't expect to create an unfunded mandate and expect and then ask for the world and then seemingly create challenges for that to happen."
 
A photovoltaic field on the northern site alone could bring in a "couple hundred thousand" dollars in rent annually, but Ching said the costs and responsibility for the akoko make the plan — as well as HCDA taking the three sites from the Navy at all — unattractive.
 
Ching said he wasn't sure that the return on 50 acres for solar production on the northern site would justify a $1 million investment to take on responsibility for the akoko.
 
Given the potential costs, the solar plan on the northern and southern sites "is a decision for (the HCDA board) to consider, but my recommendation would not be likely to support that," Ching said.
 
"It doesn't look good, but I'm still seeking to confirm all the particulars," he said.
 
Ching said HCDA will pursue a 5-megawatt solar farm on a separate land parcel it already received at Kalaeloa.
 
The Fish and Wildlife Service, meanwhile, disputes Ching's contention that it didn't want the three parcels of land, which include the two former skeet ranges and Ordy Pond, a nearby 10,000-year-old water-filled karst sinkhole.
 
"That wasn't the situation," said Nadig, the Fish and Wildlife biologist. "The situation was that the Fish and Wildlife Service did want it, and they've actively pursued trying to include that as part of their conservation lands out there at Barbers Point."
 
But Fish and Wildlife didn't have the ability to take the land because of lead contaminants at the old skeet ranges and military dumping in and around Ordy Pond, Nadig maintained.
 
"Without the Navy maintaining liability for those contaminants, then Fish and Wildlife does not have the ability to acquire those lands," he said.
 
The Navy "essentially refused to maintain that (responsibility) and said, ‘You need to take it as is,'" Nadig said.
 
As for the "unfunded mandate" claim that Ching makes against Fish and Wildlife, Nadig said, "We did not impose anything on HCDA, or we're not telling HCDA they have to do anything."
 
Fish and Wildlife has been in contact from the beginning with HCDA and the solar companies that wanted to operate on the land.
 
"We're at a point where we need to protect a large chunk of this land for the species, because it only exists there," Nadig said. "We were very upfront from the beginning — if they can't do that, then maybe they shouldn't look to doing it, and look elsewhere."
 
A 2011 Navy environmental assessment for the disposal of surplus property at the old Barbers Point said the northern trap and skeet range was in active use in 1950 and abandoned sometime before the early 1960s.
 
A lead and arsenic removal project was conducted in 2003 and 2004, with about 52,000 cubic yards of material "stabilized" using "triple super phosphate" and 42,000 cubic yards processed through mechanical screens.
 
The assessment said soil with akoko clusters was manually excavated to preserve the plants.
 
The Navy said the actions cleaned the site to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency "unrestricted use" levels.
 
Nadig said there is still the potential of finding contaminants.
 
"You can still find lead out there," he said.
 
Bill Doughty, a spokesman for Navy Region Hawaii, said a "finding of no significant impact" for the reuse of Barbers Point land requires that the Navy have an akoko conservation and management plan in place before it transfers the land.
 
A nearly $1 million Navy cleanup of Ordy Pond was mounted earlier this year.
 
The endangered native plant that's creating all of the fuss is an unassuming shrub that grows 2 to 4 feet tall with roundish leaves that are shed in the summer. It has very small flowers and fruit, and milky sap.
 
A plant relative that grows on Molokai is genetically different, officials said.
 
Ewa Plains akoko thrived on the coral shelf substrate that underlies the area and which is full of karst sinkholes and underground water ways as a result of erosion.